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University of Missouri

Whatever Floats Your Boat

Former Mizzou lineman now anchors a different type of crew.

Steve Sadich

Former MU offensive guard Steve Sadich, BS Ag ’76, captains a platform that services oil rigs in the Persian Gulf. Photo by Nicholas Benner.

Former Mizzou football captain Steve Sadich, BS Ag ’76, has always enjoyed the invigoration of a good float trip. When Gans Creek flash flooded in the late 2000s, he and son Tyler traversed the erratic waterway from Highway 63 to Rock Bridge Memorial State Park south of Columbia.

Trident One

Steve Sadich captains a movable accommodation platform called the Trident One, pictured above with red top legs. Photo courtesy of Steve Sadich.

“The creek rose six feet in 24 hours, and we floated that bad boy in kayaks,” Sadich says. “It was one of those wonderful moments when we made it through. After a father-son hug, we looked each other square in the eyes and said, ‘We’re still alive!’ ”

Sadich has taken watery adventures to the extreme throughout a maritime career that includes his current job as a captain with Millennium Offshore Services (MOS). MOS is an outfit that provides food, laundry, meeting and recreation facilities for workers aboard offshore oil rigs in the Persian Gulf. Think of it as a massive $40 million dining car on a floating, anchored train.

Trident One

The Trident One provides accommodations including food, laundry, meeting and recreation facilities for workers aboard offshore oil rigs in the Persian Gulf. Photo courtesy of Steve Sadich.

Sadich maneuvers the boat alongside the oil platform where he lowers its legs to the ocean floor and pumps on about 2 million pounds of water as ballast. After the rig is stable, he pumps off the water, elevates the installation and attaches to the refinery.

Not only does Sadich pilot the Trident One, but he also manages its international crew of 27 that serves approximately 130 oil workers.

“I’ve got two [assistants]. One is a devout Christian and the other a devout Muslim,” he says. “One has his prayer rug and Quran sitting on the dash of the pilothouse, the other his Bible, and everyone gets along fine.”

Trident One

Sadich, who has been piloting rigs since 1979, manages an international crew of 27 that serves approximately 130 oil workers. Photo courtesy of Steve Sadich.

It takes a unique personality to endure the lifestyle. Sadich, who is divorced with three sons, works five weeks on and five weeks off, taking two days to fly to the Middle East and a day to fly back to the U.S. The one-time offensive lineman has been piloting similar rigs since 1979.

“In my safety meeting, I always say, ‘Kindness is not a weakness. It’s an asset,’ ” Sadich says. “I’m proud to be an American with that philosophy.”