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University of Missouri

Looking Up

Anniversaries: a time for looking back and looking forward.

On the morning of Homecoming, Oct. 28, 1989, a Mizzou family photo was taken on Francis Quadrangle.

On the morning of Homecoming, Oct. 28, 1989, a Mizzou family photo was taken on Francis Quadrangle for MU’s 150th anniversary.

Purposefully repeated 25 years later, Aug. 23, 2014, another family photo was taken. On its 175th anniversary, the University of Missouri ushered in its largest, most talented freshman class. If you attended and want to tag yourself, here’s the link: tinyurl.com/175photo.

Purposefully repeated 25 years later, Aug. 23, 2014, another family photo was taken. On its 175th anniversary, the University of Missouri ushered in its largest, most talented freshman class. If you attended and want to tag yourself, here’s the link: tinyurl.com/175photo.

On Sept. 19, 2014, theater Professor Clyde Ruffin narrated a spectacular show that lit up the Francis Quadrangle night sky with a history of the fire that claimed Academic Hall Jan. 9, 1892. MU staff photographer Shane Epping, MA ’08, caught the image that graces this issue’s cover. A video of the event is yours for watching below. Marching Mizzou’s halftime show Sept. 20 also paced through the University of Missouri’s 175 years. Both events culminated a weeklong celebration, the highlight of which was the induction of Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin as MU’s 22nd chief executive officer.

Anniversaries are a time to look back and look forward. The two photos above — both by MIZZOU magazine photographer Rob Hill — do just that by weaving together past and present.

The one at top was taken Oct. 28, 1989, the Saturday morning of Homecoming. Front and center in the photo is Donald W. Reynolds, BJ ’27, whose $9 million gift funded the Reynolds Alumni Center.

Fast forward to the second one, taken Aug. 23, 2014, at Tiger Walk — sponsored by the Mizzou Alumni Association — before fall semester began with its record 6,515 freshmen. Hill was in a bucket of a boom truck 43 feet in the air, the same height as the Columns. A few weeks into the semester, a final $10 million gift from Reynolds and his foundation was announced, bringing its total giving to nearly $103 million. History is in the making.