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University of Missouri

MizzouDirect Casts Global Net

Pre-admittance program promises increase in international enrollment.

students with mascot

Mizzou K-12 students from Brazil visit campus for a summer program. Photo by Kathryn Fishman-Weaver.

Athletes from around the world are competing in the Olympics in Brazil this summer, including Mizzou wrestler J’den Cox. But he won’t be the only Tiger in the country.

University of Missouri High School is now in Brazil. The College of Education’s online secondary school program, which teaches students from throughout the U.S. and 64 other countries, recently added 2,500 Brazilian students to its rolls.

In Brazil the students receive a “blended” high school experience. They attend brick-and-mortar schools (heavily decked in black and gold) and receive face-to-face instruction from Brazilian teachers in a curriculum developed by College of Education experts. Students submit their assignments online; Mizzou teachers grade them and work with their Brazilian counterparts to provide feedback.

A new program element for international high school students is MizzouDirect, which offers a simplified, direct path to college enrollment. A student in MizzouDirect who creates an approved graduation plan as a high school freshman, maintains a satisfactory grade point average and meets MU enrollment requirements can be pre-admitted to Mizzou by the MU international admissions office. Currently, 750 freshmen in Brazil and 100 students in Vietnam are enrolled in MizzouDirect, though it won’t stop there.

“The global demand for such a program is huge, and we are excited to expand as far as we can around the world,” says Zac March, BS Ed ’91, M Ed ’96, director of Mizzou K-12 Schools, which includes MU High School.

The impact on campus could be huge as well.

“Within a few years, we could potentially have hundreds of new international students bolstering Mizzou’s enrollment numbers and diversifying our campus in amazing ways,” says Kathryn Chval, dean of the College of Education. — Erik Potter